Tuesday, February 13, 2018



Organizations must evaluate their rosters every offseason, which typically leads to several players leaving in free agency. Those roster spots are usually shored up by incoming rookies and other acquisitions.

 

Specific roles and talent certainly help players thrive, but opportunity remains the most important aspect as it pertains to fantasy production. This is why targets and carries are oft-discussed by analysts — opportunity is king. Moreover, as players leave for other teams, they leave behind production that could be considered opportunity for whomever replaces them.

 

The Rams entered last season with the second-most raw targets (296) and percentage of Air Yards (66%) available due to the losses of Kenny Britt, Lance Kendricks, Brian Quick and Benny Cunningham. This helps explain why Robert Woods, despite going undrafted in most fantasy leagues, was a value in hindsight. With that newfound opportunity, Woods finished with 85 targets and accounted for 21.3% of Los Angeles’ Air Yards.

 

For those yet to be introduced to Air Yards as a statistic, Josh Hermsmeyer defines this metric as, “The total number of yards thrown toward a receiver on a play in which he is targeted, both complete and incomplete. If you add them up over a game or a season, you get a receiver’s total Air Yards.”

 

Below is a list of all 32 NFL teams’ targets, target share (percentage of team targets), Air Yards and percentage of Air Yards available. As players are re-signed, this chart will be updated to reflect available opportunity for every team. This will be key when discussing ADP and forecasting potential value prior to the 2018 season.

All targets and Air Yards data is compiled from Pro Football Reference and Josh Hermsmeyer’s AirYards.com.


Available Targets by Team

 

 

These lists will be depleted by re-signings and franchise tags.

These lists will be supplemented by releases.

This page will stay updated deep into the offseason.

Organizations must evaluate their rosters every offseason, which typically leads to several players leaving in free agency. Those roster spots are usually shored up by incoming rookies and other acquisitions.

 

Specific roles and talent certainly help players thrive, but opportunity remains the most important aspect as it pertains to fantasy production. This is why targets and carries are oft-discussed by analysts — opportunity is king. Moreover, as players leave for other teams, they leave behind production that could be considered opportunity for whomever replaces them.

 

The Rams entered last season with the second-most raw targets (296) and percentage of Air Yards (66%) available due to the losses of Kenny Britt, Lance Kendricks, Brian Quick and Benny Cunningham. This helps explain why Robert Woods, despite going undrafted in most fantasy leagues, was a value in hindsight. With that newfound opportunity, Woods finished with 85 targets and accounted for 21.3% of Los Angeles’ Air Yards.

 

For those yet to be introduced to Air Yards as a statistic, Josh Hermsmeyer defines this metric as, “The total number of yards thrown toward a receiver on a play in which he is targeted, both complete and incomplete. If you add them up over a game or a season, you get a receiver’s total Air Yards.”

 

Below is a list of all 32 NFL teams’ targets, target share (percentage of team targets), Air Yards and percentage of Air Yards available. As players are re-signed, this chart will be updated to reflect available opportunity for every team. This will be key when discussing ADP and forecasting potential value prior to the 2018 season.

All targets and Air Yards data is compiled from Pro Football Reference and Josh Hermsmeyer’s AirYards.com.


Available Targets by Team

 

 

These lists will be depleted by re-signings and franchise tags.

These lists will be supplemented by releases.

This page will stay updated deep into the offseason.




























Source Article from http://rotoworld.com/articles/nfl/77898/446/available-targets–and–air-yards